Inside Pulse 12

Neo Kobe Pizza – On Video Game Musicals Part One (w/Lola Mendoza)

Welcome back for another episode of Neo Kobe Pizza, Diehard GameFAN’s weekly topical podcast! This week, we sit down to discuss musicals, and more specifically, the idea of musicals existing within the medium of video games. In the first part of this discussion, we discuss some of the core language surrounding describing the mechanics of musicals, the differences between how film, theater and musicals convey their messages and concepts, and how video games exist in a position where they can accommodate the absurdity of musicals in a way that makes them almost ideal for the genre… which is so rarely represented in the format. Hosted by Mark B Writing, featuring Lola Mendoza.

Episode 17: On Video Game Musicals Part One (w/Lola Mendoza) (Originally recorded 07/18/16)

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WARNING: We curse.

  • Christopher Hopkinson

    Just got done listening to this week’s podcast. As usual, enjoyed it…especially as one who enjoys musicals, and has a background in music (I have a BA music from UW-Whitewater). I would absolutely be on board with more video game musicals (I still smile about the idea that there was a musical adaption of “The Last Starfighter” which is one of my favorite movies), and you’re right…why aren’t there more of them? I’ve played Rhapsody, which is a pretty straight forward musical as videogame. Also, I would like to bring up Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker on the Genesis. As a “port” from the movie/musical, it kind of does what you mentioned about a hypothetical Sweeney Todd game.
    Also interesting is the difference between Rhapsody, which definitely seems to separate a lot of the music from the on screen action (non-diegesic elements) versus Moonwalker where forcing the enemies to dance to the music is actually an attack done by the Jackson avatar, not to mention the first thing that happens when you start the 1st level of the game is a recreation of the beginning of the “Bad” video with the quarter into the jukebox. In Moonwalker, the music is very much a part of the world.
    Just a couple of thoughts that came up with while listening.

  • Mark B.

    With that in mind, I think you’re really going to enjoy the next episode. Call it a hunch.